Using vCSA 6.0 as a Subordinate CA of a Microsoft Root CA

One of the nicest improvements in vSphere 6 is the ability to use the VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA) as a subordinate CA.
In most cases enterprises already have some form of PKI deployed in house and very often it is Microsoft based so I will show you how I did it with a Microsoft Enterprise CA.

I give for granted that the Microsoft PKI is already in place, in my case it is a single VM with an Enterprise Microsoft CA installed.

The vCSA should also be already be in place.

As first step I edit the certool config file but first I make a backup of the default configuration:

mkdir /root/backup
cp /usr/lib/vmware-vmca/share/config/certool.cfg /root/backup
vi /usr/lib/vmware-vmca/share/config/certool.cfg

Compile the config file with the parameters that are good for your setup then save the file and exit.

Now we have to generate a certificate request for the VMCA to pass to the Microsoft CA and there are many ways to do that, I am going to use the vSphere Certificate Manager Utility that will automatically take most steps for me:

/usr/lib/vmware-vmca/bin/certificate-manager

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.20.25
At this point I have the .csr file (/root/root_signing_cert.csr) and the private key (/root/root_signing_cert.key) so let’s feed it to the Microsoft CA as you normally would for any certificate request using the “Subordinate Certification Authority” template:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.25.43Now you have to take the crt file in base64 format on the vCSA and also the Microsoft CA root certificate in base64 format as well; copying files with SCP will be a challenge because the root user on the vCSA by default doesn’t use the bash shell so if you want to use this method you need to edit the “/etc/passwd” and set the root user to use bash as a shell and then you can put it back as it was once you are done transferring the files.

It could be just simpler to open the certs on your computer and the connect to the vCSA via SSH and copy the content inside new files; one way or another you need to take the certificates on the vCSA, in my case they are “root_signing_cert.pem” and “cam.pem”.

Now we need to combine the two files in a chain file:

cp root_signing_cert.pem caroot.pem
cat ca.pem >> caroot.pem

If you open the “caroot.pem” file you should see a single cert file with both ca and certificate one after another.

Now we can go back to the vSphere Certificate Manager Utility to apply this certificate:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.36.16

Since we have already edited the certool.cfg file we just have to confirm the values that the wizard proposes, just remember to enter the FQDN of the vCenter server:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.37.18
If you have a successful outcome you can connect via browser to your vSphere Web Client and check the certificate:


Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.39.59

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.40.08

 

As you can see now this is a trusted connection and the VMCA has released certificates for the Solution Users on behalf of the Microsoft Root CA.

You can check the active certificate in the vSphere Web Client in the Administration section:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.42.30

In case you decide to remove the original root certificate then you will have to refresh the Security Token Service (STS) Root Certificate, and replace the VMware Directory Service Certificate following the vSphere 6 documentation.

Now the VMCA is capable of signing certificates that are valid in you PKI chain and are trusted by default in you Windows domain by all clients.

 

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