How to backup, restore and schedule vCenter Server Appliance vPostgres Database

Now that we are moving away from SQL Express in favor of vPostgres for vCenter simple install on Windows and since vPostgres is the default database engine for (not so simple) install of vCSA I thought it would be nice to learn how to backup and restore this database.

Since it’s easier to perform these tasks on Windows and since there are already many guides on the Internet I will focus on vCSA because I think that more and more production environment (small and big) will be using vCSA since now it’s just as functional as vCenter if not more. (more on this in another post…)

You will find all instructions for both Windows and vCSA versions of vCenter on KB2091961, but more important than that you will find there also the python scripts that will work all the magic for you so grab the “linux_backup_restore.zip” file and copy it to the vCSA:

scp linux_backup_restore.zip root@<vcenter>:/tmp

For the copy to work you must have previously changed the shell configuration for the root user in “/etc/passwd” from “/bin/appliancesh” to “/bin/bash”

Then:

unzip linux_backup_restore.zip
chmod +x backup_lin.py
mkdir /tmp/linux_backup_restore/backups
python /tmp/linux_backup_restore/backup_lin.py -f /tmp/linux_backup_restore/backups/VCDB.bak

All you will see when the backup is completed is:

Backup completed successfully.

You should see the backup file now:

vcenter:/tmp/linux_backup_restore/backups # ls -lha
total 912K
drwx------ 2 root root 4.0K Jun 3 19:41 .
drwx------ 3 root root 4.0K Jun 3 19:28 ..
-rw------- 1 root root 898K Jun 3 19:29 VCDB.bak

At this point I removed a folder in my vCenter VM and Templates view, then I logged off the vSphere WebClient and started a restore:

service vmware-vpxd stop
service vmware-vdcs stop
python /tmp/linux_backup_restore/restore_lin.py -f /tmp/linux_backup_restore/backups/VCDB.bak
service vmware-vpxd start
service vmware-vdcs start

I logged back in the WebClient and my folder was back, so mission accomplished.

Now how do I schedule this thing? Using the good old crontab but before that I will write a script that will run the backup and also give a name to the backup file corresponding to the weekday so I can have a rotation of 7 days:

#!/bin/bash
_dow="$(date +'%A')"
_bak="VCDB_${_dow}.bak"
python /tmp/linux_backup_restore/backup_lin.py -f /tmp/linux_backup_restore/backups/${_bak}

I saved it as “backup_vcdb” and made it executable with “chmod +x backup_vcdb”.

Now to schedule it just run “crontab -e” and enter a single line just like this:

0 23 * * * python /tmp/linux_backup_restore/backup_vcdb

This basically means that the system will execute the script every day of every week of every year at 11pm.

After the crontab job runs you should see a new backup with a name of this sort:

vcenter:/tmp/linux_backup_restore/backups # ls -lha
total 1.8M
drwx------ 2 root root 4.0K Jun 3 19:46 .
drwx------ 3 root root 4.0K Jun 3 19:28 ..
-rw------- 1 root root 898K Jun 3 19:29 VCDB.bak
-rw------- 1 root root 900K Jun 3 19:46 VCDB_Wednesday.bak

You will also have the log files of these backups in “/var/mail/root”.

Enjoy your new backup routine 🙂

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Using vCSA 6.0 as a Subordinate CA of a Microsoft Root CA

One of the nicest improvements in vSphere 6 is the ability to use the VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA) as a subordinate CA.
In most cases enterprises already have some form of PKI deployed in house and very often it is Microsoft based so I will show you how I did it with a Microsoft Enterprise CA.

I give for granted that the Microsoft PKI is already in place, in my case it is a single VM with an Enterprise Microsoft CA installed.

The vCSA should also be already be in place.

As first step I edit the certool config file but first I make a backup of the default configuration:

mkdir /root/backup
cp /usr/lib/vmware-vmca/share/config/certool.cfg /root/backup
vi /usr/lib/vmware-vmca/share/config/certool.cfg

Compile the config file with the parameters that are good for your setup then save the file and exit.

Now we have to generate a certificate request for the VMCA to pass to the Microsoft CA and there are many ways to do that, I am going to use the vSphere Certificate Manager Utility that will automatically take most steps for me:

/usr/lib/vmware-vmca/bin/certificate-manager

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.20.25
At this point I have the .csr file (/root/root_signing_cert.csr) and the private key (/root/root_signing_cert.key) so let’s feed it to the Microsoft CA as you normally would for any certificate request using the “Subordinate Certification Authority” template:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.25.43Now you have to take the crt file in base64 format on the vCSA and also the Microsoft CA root certificate in base64 format as well; copying files with SCP will be a challenge because the root user on the vCSA by default doesn’t use the bash shell so if you want to use this method you need to edit the “/etc/passwd” and set the root user to use bash as a shell and then you can put it back as it was once you are done transferring the files.

It could be just simpler to open the certs on your computer and the connect to the vCSA via SSH and copy the content inside new files; one way or another you need to take the certificates on the vCSA, in my case they are “root_signing_cert.pem” and “cam.pem”.

Now we need to combine the two files in a chain file:

cp root_signing_cert.pem caroot.pem
cat ca.pem >> caroot.pem

If you open the “caroot.pem” file you should see a single cert file with both ca and certificate one after another.

Now we can go back to the vSphere Certificate Manager Utility to apply this certificate:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.36.16

Since we have already edited the certool.cfg file we just have to confirm the values that the wizard proposes, just remember to enter the FQDN of the vCenter server:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.37.18
If you have a successful outcome you can connect via browser to your vSphere Web Client and check the certificate:


Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.39.59

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.40.08

 

As you can see now this is a trusted connection and the VMCA has released certificates for the Solution Users on behalf of the Microsoft Root CA.

You can check the active certificate in the vSphere Web Client in the Administration section:

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 23.42.30

In case you decide to remove the original root certificate then you will have to refresh the Security Token Service (STS) Root Certificate, and replace the VMware Directory Service Certificate following the vSphere 6 documentation.

Now the VMCA is capable of signing certificates that are valid in you PKI chain and are trusted by default in you Windows domain by all clients.

 

How to revert new Transparent Page Sharing behaviour

There have been a lot of blog posts around warning us that starting from vSphere 5.5 Update2d (build 2403361) TPS will be basically turned off.

Besides comments about the why and how to partially re-enable inter-VM TPS I just think in most cases it might make sense to restore the original behaviour; I have been in the process of upgrading an infrastructure where the RAM contrain represented a much bigger concearn than the specific security reason why TPS has been turned off so I decided to take a look at the shared memory metrics in vCenter just to find out that post-upgrade situation wouldn’t be exactly heavenly if all the shared memory pages would be translated into unique pages.

I found this arcicle KB2097593 where it explains the various status of the settings you can apply and one of them basically disables the new behaviour restoring the old fashion TPS:

Featured image

In other words setting the value “ShareForceSalting” to 0 will bring things back in time.

The complete procedure is as follows:

1. Log in to ESX (i)/vCenter with the VI-Client.
2. Select ESX (i) relevant host.
3. In the Configuration tab, click Advanced Settings (link) under the software section.
4. In the Advanced Settings window, click Mem.
5. Search for Mem.ShareForceSalting and set the value to 0.
6. Click OK.
7. Reboot host

vSphere 6 Certificate Lifecycle Management

Recently I’ve been fighting with a vSphere environment and CA certificates and I thought a lot about certificate management and lifecycle in a VMware vSphere environment after that and how much it needs improvement. With the SSL Certificate Automation Tool VMware made a step in the right direction and even if the tools itself is sometimes a little buggy it is still very handy in automating a long and error prone process. In vSphere 6 VMware is taking another step in the right direction to help us create, apply and manage SSL certificates in a vSphere environment, but before talking about this we need to talk a bit about what’s new in SSO and vCenter architecture in vSphere 6. Since the introduction of SSO VMware changed its architecture in every major release, starting from 5.1 to 5.5 and now to 6.0 so let’s make a little bit of history:

Featured image

The new vSphere 6 management architecture introduces two main roles that you can deploy, these are the Management Node and the Platform Service Controller (PSC); the reason behind this separation is to have a logical entity that will take care of the main management features while another entity will hold the core and security features of the solution. What is nice about this separation is that you don’t need a 1:1 ratio between Management Nodes and PSCs so you can install PSC on separate boxes and replicate between them and then have as many Management nodes as you need (as long as you are within the same SSO domain)

Featured image

For HA scenario if you install PSC on separate boxes you will still need a load balancer. Supported solutions are Big-IP F5 and NetScaler so far.

You can obviously still install everything in one box:

Featured image

You might have noticed that the HA model for SSO was active/passive in 5.1, then active/active in 5.5 and now is active/passive again; this is due to the re-engineering of the Secure Token Service (STS) which is moving to a new and more robust method of STS (known as WebSSO) which is the same already used by vCAC (or vRealize Automation if you will) and that will be used from now forward instead of the old 5.5 method (WS-Trust). Let’s see how services are spread out on each role:

Let’s take a look to the services within the Management Node and the PSC:

Featured image

In the Management Node we can find services and features that every vSphere Admin feels very comfortable and familiar with such as vCenter Server, vSphere Web Client, Syslog Collector, etc., but two of them deserve a few words:

  • Virtual Datacenter Service: this service is new and it has been introduced to help mitigate the limitation connected with the Datacenter object in vCenter as a Management boundary.
  • (Optional) vPostgres: This component is obviously referring to the vCenter Appliance (thus optional) but I believe more and more new deployments or upgrades deserve to be considered a good fit for vCSA since VMware announced complete equality of features between vCenter installed on Windows and vCSA; leave alone the fuss of dedicating Windows licenses for vCenter which might not be a huge problem I just find the process of patching ad upgrading a vCSA simply amazing and it’s not a secret that products like EVO:RAIL make extensive use of vCSA. VMware wants to move all their services deployment model towards Virtual Appliances, this is not a secret and we need to get used to it, the sooner the better, but I’m digressing…

Featured image

In the Platform Service Controller or PSC we find our old friend SSO (we have had a rough past but now we are on better terms) and quite a few new services:

  • VMware Single Sign-On
    • Secure Token Service (STS)
    • Identity Management Service (IdM)
    • Directory Service (VMDir)
  • VMware Certificate Authority (VMCA)
  • VMware Endpoint Certificate Store (VECS)
  • VMware Licensing Service
  • Authentication Framework Daemon (AFD)
  • Component Manager Service (CM)
  • HTTP Reverse Proxy

Describing all these services is out of the scope of this post but as you probably guess two of them will be our focus: the VMware Certificate Authority (or VMCA) and the VMware Endpoint Certificate Store (or VECS). But what are the roles of VMCA and VECS? The VMCA is no more or less than a CA, so you can:

  • Generate Certificates
  • Generate CRLs
  • Use the UI
  • Use the Command Line Interface to replace certificates

The VECS is where all certificates within the PSC are stored, with the only exception of the ESXi certificates that are stored locally on vSphere hosts, so here you can:

  • Store certificates and keys
  • Sync trusted certificates
  • Sync CRLs
  • Use the UI
  • Use the CLI to perform various actions

Since VMCA and VECS are part of the PSC, they will take advantage of the Multi-Master Replication Model which is offered by the Directory Service (VMDir) in order to achieve HA. In the past every service had its own user and required its own certificate but this is not the case anymore since we now have Solution Users (SU); since the number of services has increased significantly it would be impractical to manage the lifecycle of this many certificates so now we have 4 main SU that will hold the certificate used for a number of services.

Voila_Capture 2015-01-08_08-14-37_pm_white_background

What about use cases/scenarios in which I can implement VMCA? In what ways you can use this new tool?

Featured image

Scenario 1 and 2 are similar: the VMCA is the CA that releases certificates for all Solution Users (SU), the only difference is that in scenario 1 the VMCA is the root CA and you will need to distribute the Root CA Certificate so that all corporate browsers will trust it, while in scenario 2 the VMCA becomes part of an existing PKI as a subordinate CA and you certificate trust.

Featured image

In scenario 3 VMCA is installed but not used, CSRs are created and submitted to an external CA and VECS will be used to store certificates in PEM format.

Featured image

My favorite is scenario 2 because most enterprises I see already have a PKI (Microsoft CA usually) and all clients already trust the CA certificates, so adding the VMCA as s subordinate is a non disruptive process with a very low maintenance impact on the PKI itself, it protects investments already made to implement the current PKI and  preserves the knowledge to run the PKI.

Replacing certificates is still a CLI task (looks like Powershell will be involved) but VMCA and VECS are a very promising step toward the right direction for simplifying certificate lifecycle management in a vSphere environment.

Migrating NTUSER.DAT and UsrClass.DAT with Horizon Mirage

I don’t know about you but I found it to be a little weird that there is not way to tell Mirage to move NTUSER.DAT and UsrClass.DAT when performing an hardware migration.

Considering Mirage uses USMT to migrate the user state mean that this is a precise choice from VMware and not a technological limitation.

Those two files include two pretty important user settings: the user portion of the registry and the user class of the registry.

If you want to have the migrated workstation to have exactly the same look and feel, including the customization of the single applications settings, icon positioning on the desktop and so on you definitely want to apply NTUSER.DAT and UsrClass.DAT as well; I am sure there are scenarios where you don’t want this but there are also scenarios but if you want you should be able to do it.

In the Factory Defaults this is explicitly forbidden, so if you want to apply NTUSER.DAT and UsrClass.DAT too you need to follow this procedure:

  • Log in to your Mirage Management Server
  • Open a command line as administrator
  • Browse to C:\Program Files\Wanova\Mirage Server
  • Launch the Server CLI: “Wanova.Server.Cli.exe <server name/ip>” of your Mirage Management Server such as <localhost>
  • Enter: “GetFactoryPolicy c:\factorypolicy.xml” (Get the current factory policy)
  • Edit the file c:\factorypolicy.xml (e.g. with notepad,notepad++)
  • Save the file by entering: “SetFactoryPolicy c:\factorypolicy.xml”

When editing the file, you can search for “NTUSER” and “UsrClass.dat” and just remove the lines with “”.

Powershell Script for Shutting Down your vSphere Environment

Every now and then I need to setup an environment so that if a power outage occurs out of business hours there is a sort of automation taking care of that gracefully shutting down all VMs and Hosts to prevent failures.

For some reason I can never use older scripts I already have because whether they are too old and need some rewriting or because they don’t take into account some aspect of the specific environment I’m working on; one way or another it always feels like starting over.

While I was about to write a new one I stumbled across this blog post by Mike Preston and I was happy to find a very straightforward, simple and yet very complete script which would cover most of your (and mine too) needs.

Here are the aspects I was positively impressed about:

– it keeps into account HA
– it keeps into account DRS and stops it from moving things around while shutting down everything (nice)
– it allows you to specify if vCenter is virtual and it takes care of it for last, including the host where vCenter resides (nice!!)
– it keeps into account that VMs might just not shutdown gracefully for some reason; this is a major reason why most scripts would fail (see VDI streamed VMs)
– it writes events in a log file which is nice to go and look at in case you want to know what happened once you’re back online
– it dumps to file the list of powered on VMs at the moment of shutdown so you can manually turn everything back on as it was or take advantage of another nice script wrote by Mike called “poweronvms”

Ever if this script is definitely one of the most complete it is still lacking some of the requirements I needed, so with Mike permission (thanks Mike!) I added some things:

– added check for loading VMware PowerCLI Snap-In
– support for vApps
– removed annoying error messages when variables are = null
– added support for encrypted password dumped on a file (I don’t like password in clear text in scripts)
– added date-time in the log file for each event
– minor cosmetic in the output
– tested with vsphere 5.5 U1

Before we start using the script we need to create a password file so that passwords are not stored in clear text in the script itself:

mkdir c:\shutdown
Read-Host -Prompt "Enter password" -AsSecureString | ConvertFrom-SecureString | out-file c:\shutdown\cred.txt
(type in the password of the user you want to use for running the script)
cat c:\shutdown\cred.txt

The output should be something like this:

01000000d08c9ddf0115d1118c7a00c04fc297eb0100000092295625f5c35b4bb8af99be46e6679d0000000002000000000003660000c0000000100
000007b8d21c33686ef6ec751c0f671e7ff510000000004800000a00000001000000022d4534785ecda5799047d48f0f79a4618000000a1376ef3bf
fa5a3a928bee66d68eab5d49b12308f9d0b63f140000002ca923ea8eb54ff11c5864d9f722931a4ec85597

This is a hash of the password calculated using the current Windows credentials and it’s also connected with the Windows machine you run the command from, so this password file is not portable and can be used only but the user who generated it.

The script is already set up to use such password file, just edit the variables in the top of the script accordingly.

Here it is:

#################################################################################
# Power off VMs (poweroffvms.ps1)
#
# This script does have a 'partner' script that powers the VMs back on, you can
# grab that script at http://blog.mwpreston.net/shares/
#
# Created By: Mike Preston, 2012 - With a whole lot of help from Eric Wright
#                                  (@discoposse)
#
# Variables:  $vcenter - The IP/DNS of your vCenter Server
#             $username/password - credentials for your vCenter Server
#             $filename - path to csv file to store powered on vms
#			  used for the poweronvms.ps1 script.
#             $cluster - Name of specific cluster to target within vCenter
#             $datacenter - Name of specific datacenter to target within vCenter
#
#################################################################################

if ( (Get-PSSnapin -Name VMware.VimAutomation.Core -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue) -eq $null )
{
	Add-PsSnapin VMware.VimAutomation.Core
}

# Some variables
$vcenter = "<vcenter_fqdn>"
$username = "<vcenter_username>"
$password = get-content C:\shutdown\cred.txt | convertto-securestring
$credentials = new-object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential $username, $password
$cluster = "<cluster_name>"
$datacenter = "<datacenter_name>"
$filename = "c:\shutdown\poweredonvms.csv"
$time = ( get-date ).ToString('HH-mm-ss')
$date = ( get-date ).ToString('dd-MM-yyyy')
$logfile = New-Item -type file "C:\shutdown\ShutdownLog-$date-$time.txt" -Force

# For use with a virtualized vCenter - bring it down last 🙂 - if you don't need this functionality
# simply leave the variable set to NA and the script will work as it always had
$vCenterVMName = "NA"

Write-Host ""
Write-Host "Shutdown command has been sent to the vCenter Server." -Foregroundcolor yellow
Write-Host "This script will shutdown all of the VMs and hosts located in $datacenter." -Foregroundcolor yellow
Write-Host "Upon completion, this server ($vcenter) will also be shutdown gracefully." -Foregroundcolor yellow
Write-Host ""
Sleep 5

Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) PowerOff Script Engaged"
Add-Content $logfile ""

# Connect to vCenter
Write-Host "Connecting to vCenter - $vcenter.... " -nonewline
Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Connecting to vCenter - $vcenter"
$success = Connect-VIServer $vcenter -Credential $credentials -WarningAction:SilentlyContinue
if ($success) { Write-Host "Connected!" -Foregroundcolor Green }
else
{
    Write-Host "Something is wrong, Aborting script" -Foregroundcolor Red
    Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Something is wrong, Aborting script"
    exit
}
Write-Host ""
Add-Content $logfile  ""

# Turn Off vApps
Write-Host "Stopping VApps...." -Foregroundcolor Green
Write-Host ""
Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Stopping VApps..."
Add-Content $logfile ""

$vapps = Get-VApp | Where { $_.Status -eq "Started" }

if ($vapps -ne $null)
{
	ForEach ($vapp in $vapps)
	{
			Write-Host "Processing $vapp.... " -ForegroundColor Green
			Write-Host ""
			Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Stopping $vapp."
			Add-Content $logfile ""
			Stop-VApp -VApp $vapp -Confirm:$false | out-null
			Write-Host "$vapp stopped." -Foregroundcolor Green
			Write-Host ""
	}
}

Write-Host "VApps stopped." -Foregroundcolor Green
Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) VApps stopped."
Add-Content $logfile ""

# Get a list of all powered on VMs - used for powering back on....
Get-VM -Location $cluster | where-object {$_.PowerState -eq "PoweredOn" } | Select Name | Export-CSV $filename

# Change DRS Automation level to partially automated...
Write-Host "Changing cluster DRS Automation Level to Partially Automated" -Foregroundcolor green
Get-Cluster $cluster | Set-Cluster -DrsAutomation PartiallyAutomated -confirm:$false 

# Change the HA Level
Write-Host ""
Write-Host "Disabling HA on the cluster..." -Foregroundcolor green
Write-Host ""
Add-Content $logfile "Disabling HA on the cluster..."
Add-Content $logfile ""
Get-Cluster $cluster | Set-Cluster -HAEnabled:$false -confirm:$false 

# Get VMs again (we will do this again instead of parsing the file in case a VM was powered in the nanosecond that it took to get here.... 🙂
Write-Host ""
Write-Host "Retrieving a list of powered on guests...." -Foregroundcolor Green
Write-Host ""
Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Retrieving a list of powered on guests...."
Add-Content $logfile ""
$poweredonguests = Get-VM -Location $cluster | where-object {$_.PowerState -eq "PoweredOn" }

Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Checking to see if vCenter is virtualized"

# Retrieve host info for vCenter
if ($vcenterVMName -ne "NA")
{
    Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) vCenter is indeed virtualized, getting ESXi host hosting vCenter Server"
    $vCenterHost = (Get-VM $vCenterVMName).Host.Name
    Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) $vCenterVMName currently running on $vCenterHost - will process this last"
}
else
{
    Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) vCenter is not virtualized"
}

Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Proceeding with VM PowerOff"
Add-Content $logfile ""

# And now, let's start powering off some guests....
ForEach ( $guest in $poweredonguests )
{
    if ($guest.Name -ne $vCenterVMName)
    {
        Write-Host "Processing $guest.... " -ForegroundColor Green
        Write-Host "Checking for VMware tools install" -Foregroundcolor Green
        $guestinfo = get-view -Id $guest.ID
        if ($guestinfo.config.Tools.ToolsVersion -eq 0)
        {
            Write-Host "No VMware tools detected in $guest , hard power this one" -ForegroundColor Yellow
            Write-Host ""
            Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) $guest - no VMware tools, hard power off"
            Stop-VM $guest -confirm:$false | out-null
        }
        else
        {
           write-host "VMware tools detected.  I will attempt to gracefully shutdown $guest"
           Write-Host ""
           Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) $guest - VMware tools installed, gracefull shutdown"
           $vmshutdown = $guest | shutdown-VMGuest -Confirm:$false | out-null
        }
    }
}

# Let's wait a minute or so for shutdowns to complete
Write-Host ""
Write-Host "Giving VMs 2 minutes before resulting in hard poweroff"
Write-Host ""
Add-Content $logfile ""
Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Waiting a couple minutes then hard powering off all remaining VMs"
Sleep 120

# Now, let's go back through again to see if anything is still powered on and shut it down if it is
Write-Host "Beginning Phase 2 - anything left on.... night night...." -ForegroundColor red
Write-Host ""

# Get our list of guests still powered on...

$poweredonguests = Get-VM -Location $cluster | where-object {$_.PowerState -eq "PoweredOn" }

if ($poweredonguests -ne $null)
{
	ForEach ( $guest in $poweredonguests )
	{
		if ($guest.Name -ne $vCenterVMName)
		{
			Write-Host "Processing $guest ...." -ForegroundColor Green
			#no checking for toosl, we just need to blast it down...
			write-host "Shutting down $guest - I don't care, it just needs to be off..." -ForegroundColor Yellow
                        Write-Host ""
			Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) $guest - Hard Power Off"
			Stop-VM $guest -confirm:$false | out-null
		}
	}
}

# Wait 30 seconds
Write-Host "Waiting 30 seconds and then proceding with host power off"
Write-Host ""
Add-Content $logfile ""
Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Processing power off of all hosts now"
Sleep 30

# and now its time to slam down the hosts - I've chosen to go by datacenter here but you could put the cluster
# There are some standalone hosts in the datacenter that I would also like to shutdown, those vms are set to
# start and stop with the host, so i can just shut those hosts down and they will take care of the vm shutdown 😉

$esxhosts = Get-VMHost -Location $cluster
foreach ($esxhost in $esxhosts)
{
    if ($esxhost.Name -ne $vCenterHost)
    {
        #Shutem all down
        Write-Host "Shutting down $esxhost" -ForegroundColor Green
        Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Shutting down $esxhost"
        $esxhost | Foreach {Get-View $_.ID} | Foreach {$_.ShutdownHost_Task($TRUE)}
    }
}

# Finally shut down the host which vCenter resides on if using that functionality
if ($vcenterVMName -ne "NA")
{
    Add-Content $logfile ""
    Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) Processing $vcenterHost - shutting down "
    Get-VMhost $vCenterHost | Foreach {Get-View $_.ID} | Foreach {$_.ShutdownHost_Task($TRUE)} | out-null
	Write-Host "Shutdown Complete." -ForegroundColor Green
}

Add-Content $logfile ""
Add-Content $logfile "$(get-date -f dd/MM/yyyy) $(get-date -f HH:mm:ss) All done!"
# That's a wrap

Just to say something obvious, test!

I used vCenter Simulator 2.0 for initial testing and once happy I used a real environment.

Now go and turn off all the vSphere environments you can! (just kidding)

(Seriously, I’m just kidding, don’t do it! Really! Just don’t)

Upgrading/Installing vSphere 5.5 Update 1 skipping the NFS bug

Lately I had to deal with a customer who run into the NFS bug without even knowing it.

Most people updated vSphere to 5.5 update 1 to fix the Heartbleed bug (or maybe because it was just the latest version available to install) but then they had to deal with the other problems; I blame the Heartbeat bug for the rush out of update 1 which lead to the NFS bug. Just my 2 cents.

Anyway, sooner or later you will have to get there but you definitely don’t want to deal with NFS problems, so I figured I would write a small how-to for building a customized vSphere ISO that is already patched for Heartbleed and NFS bugs.

In case you just have to update you can use VMware Update Manger or do it manually, but if  you have to do a fresh install you will need a two steps approach (and still get the NFS bug before you patch) or install an older version and jump straight to the latest patched version; one way or another it would just be better to start with a patched version.

First of all you need PowerCLI and the latest patch (ESXi550-201406001.zip).

Then in my case I created a folder in “C:\vSpherePatches” and did as follows:

Add-EsxSoftwareDepot C:\vSpherePatches\ESXi550-201406001.zip     # Adding the patch file to the repository
Get-EsxImageProfile | fl     # Listing Image Profile in the repository
Export-EsxImageProfile -ImageProfile ESXi-5.5.0-20140604001-standard -ExportToIso -FilePath C:\vSpherePatches\VMware-VMvisor-Installer-5.5.0.update01-1881737.x86_64.iso     # Exporting the standard Image Profile to an iso file

If you want to have the feel of an official VMware release you can name the iso file like I did: “VMware-VMvisor-Installer-5.5.0.update01-1881737.x86_64.iso”. At least I have the feeling this would be what they would call it based on their naming convention.

Now you can install the latest build with no fear of incurring in (known) bugs. 😉

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